I'm a young adult living with haemophilia

I'm a young adult living with haemophilia

The years of transition between the end of your teens and the start of early adulthood are some of the most exciting and important in your life. You might be getting ready to finish school, move out of home and be an independent person away from your family and where you grew up. But as you continue to grow, so do your responsibilities. For someone living with haemophilia, it can  be nerve-wracking: on top of all the other new beginnings you also have to think about managing your haemophilia by yourself. With the right support and information, your journey through young adulthood can be empowering

You're the boss

As you get older, you  take on more responsibilities. This can be empowering and can be scary.’ you will start managing your treatment and health on your own. This may include maintaining an ongoing dialogue with your healthcare team, attending appointments, ordering medication and keeping a treatment log. At first this may seem overwhelming but with time, you will master the routine!

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Breaking free and opening up

Finding your own way

Having haemophilia as a teenager or young adult can be challenging. During this period of life, sticking to treatment plans, handling injections, social stresses, planning can feel too much at times. You will learn to find your own balance between protection and possibility.

Opening up

It may be important to share that you have haemophilia, for example with your college or university, or with your friends.

Let's talk about sex

Sex is entirely normal and healthy for someone living with haemophilia. There maybe some questions you will have about sex in relation to your condition. It might not be something you will be rushing to discuss with your parents – but you can talk to  your doctor or another member of your care team.

If you’ve met someone special and you’re not sure when or how to tell them about your haemophilia, there’s one very important thing to keep in mind: it’s up to you! It might not be easy, but you can help them understand your condition and educate them about haemophilia. You might like to discuss your particular condition or treatment plan. If they’re worth your time, they will be understanding and supportive.

The best advice when it comes to sex and haemophilia is to speak to the health care professionals at your treatment centre.

Click here to continue reading about the many possibilities for a life beyond haemophilia.

NP-9165
Date of preparation: November 2019

I'm a young adult living with haemophilia

The years of transition between the end of your teens and the start of early adulthood are some of the most exciting and important in your life. You might be getting ready to finish school, move out of home and be an independent person away from your family and where you grew up. But as you continue to grow, so do your responsibilities. For someone living with haemophilia, it can  be nerve-wracking: on top of all the other new beginnings you also have to think about managing your haemophilia by yourself. With the right support and information, your journey through young adulthood can be empowering

You're the boss

As you get older, you  take on more responsibilities. This can be empowering and can be scary.’ you will start managing your treatment and health on your own. This may include maintaining an ongoing dialogue with your healthcare team, attending appointments, ordering medication and keeping a treatment log. At first this may seem overwhelming but with time, you will master the routine!

Responsive banner
Breaking free and opening up

Finding your own way

Having haemophilia as a teenager or young adult can be challenging. During this period of life, sticking to treatment plans, handling injections, social stresses, planning can feel too much at times. You will learn to find your own balance between protection and possibility.

Opening up

It may be important to share that you have haemophilia, for example with your college or university, or with your friends.

Let's talk about sex

Sex is entirely normal and healthy for someone living with haemophilia. There maybe some questions you will have about sex in relation to your condition. It might not be something you will be rushing to discuss with your parents – but you can talk to  your doctor or another member of your care team.

If you’ve met someone special and you’re not sure when or how to tell them about your haemophilia, there’s one very important thing to keep in mind: it’s up to you! It might not be easy, but you can help them understand your condition and educate them about haemophilia. You might like to discuss your particular condition or treatment plan. If they’re worth your time, they will be understanding and supportive.

The best advice when it comes to sex and haemophilia is to speak to the health care professionals at your treatment centre.

Click here to continue reading about the many possibilities for a life beyond haemophilia.

NP-9165
Date of preparation: November 2019