What's so good about working out?

What's so good about working out?

The importance of exercise

Strong muscles are needed to support the joints and provide better balance and bodily control. People with haemophilia should therefore be encouraged to be physically active but must remember to take their medication regularly to ensure they are protected.

It is important to discuss physical activity with your haemophilia team.

Physical exercise and staying active brings many general health benefits. It improves your fitness, boosts your self-esteem and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and some cancers.1

Regular physiotherapy, physical activity and exercise can be particularly beneficial for patients with haemophilia because it increases muscle strength and improves joint stability which can reduce your risk of injury, bleeds and joint damage.2

Get inspired

Clive’s story deomstrates that if you put your mind to something, you could accomplish extraordinary things even if they seem impossible at first. The story of Clive and his wife Clare, their drive and can-do attitude, is pure inspiration. What dream of yours are you ready to conquer?

How does exercise help my joints?

The joints in your body, including your knees, hips and ankles, are supported by different types of muscles. Reduced strength in these muscles can increase the risk of frequent joint bleeds, which as you know can lead to chronic swelling and pain. And this can result in a cycle of deterioration that continues with every bleed.

Exercise cycle

Exercise can protect your joints from deterioration by strengthening those muscles, improving your coordination and increasing your flexibility. It can also help you maintain a healthy weight, which minimises the stress on your joints. All these benefits work together in perfect harmony to reduce the frequency and severity of joint bleeds.

Exercise

What do I need to consider before I begin any physical activity? 

It is important to approach exercise and physical activity properly so that you gain the most from it.2 Before you start, there are a few factors to consider. What are your goals? What are your needs? These could be physical or emotional, or both. Here are some examples of the types of questions you might want to ask yourself:

What do I want to achieve from exercise?
What is my current physical ability?
What are my exercise and lifestyle goals?

Once you have given your needs and goals some thought, have a discussion with your physiotherapist, consultant or nurse. They can use this information to help you develop an exercise plan that is appropriate for you.2 
Together, you can:

Assess any potential risks associated with different types of sports and exercise routines
Consider strategies to help you manage those risks
Create a plan that will help you achieve your goals both physically and mentally

How do I choose an activity that's right for me? 

You should choose an activity based on your interests, goals and level of ability. Most sports are fine to participate in, however as someone with haemophilia, you may need to consider avoiding certain high contact sports that may increase your risk of injury,2,4 such as football or rugby. Instead, you could participate in lower intensity activities, such as 5-a-side football or touch rugby, which will still give you a good workout and can be just as fun and competitive (if that’s what you look for in a sport).2,4 With the help of your physiotherapist, you can choose the activities that are right for you.2,4

What things should I consider when developing a routine?

An exercise routine should incorporate activities that help to maintain and enhance your endurance and cardiovascular fitness, as well as your coordination, muscle strength, flexibility and balance.2 It is beneficial to exercise for approximately 30 minutes at regular intervals throughout the week.2 However, your physiotherapist will be able to advise what would be most suitable for you.

Take it slow!

Don’t do too much too soon. Overworking yourself can result in injury and may increase your risk of bleeds. Ease into your exercise routine and build up as the weeks progress. Muscle and joint aches during or after exercise or physical activity can be normal. However, it is important to stop what you are doing at any time if you experience any pain. If you suspect that you are bleeding during exercise, then contact your care team. Do not push yourself to finish the workout or activity.

What should I do before and after I exercise or take part in a physical activity? 

When starting exercise, it can be tempting to jump straight into the activity without warming up. However, not preparing your body properly can increase your risk of injury.2 Instead of starting at 100%, ease into your workout with a warm up routine that incorporates gentle exercise and different stretches to help you improve your flexibility and prepare your body for exertion.2

Cooling down after exercise is also important. It helps your muscles recover and prevents them from getting stiff. Starting and ending your activity in this way will reduce the likelihood of developing an injury that could slow down your progress.2 However, if you see a physiotherapist regularly, they will be able to advise you what would be most suitable for you!

Active life

Go win that football match!

Go that extra mile!

Go for the hole in one!

Should I plan my infusions around my exercise routine?

When planning an exercise routine, it is preferable to time your infusions accordingly. Try to plan to do your more active exercises when your factor levels are high to maximise your protection.2 Your haemophilia team will help you coordinate your infusion and exercise schedules in a way that is right for you.

If I incur an injury, when can I restart doing physical activity? 

There are a multitude of factors that will dictate when you can restart physical activity, such as the severity of the injury or bleed. Your physiotherapist and care team will be able to evaluate this and guide you through any rehabilitation that might be needed. All activities should be reintroduced gradually following a joint bleed or injury.4

REFERENCES:

1. Wittmeier K and Mulder K. Haemophilia 2007;13(2):31-37.
2. Negrier C, et al. Haemophilia 2013;19:487-498.
3. Tiktinsky R, et al. Haemophilia 2002;8:22-27.
4. World Federation of Hemophilia. Guidelines for the management of haemophilia. 2nd edition. 2012.

 

NP-8249
Date of preparation: October 2019

What's so good about working out?

The importance of exercise

Strong muscles are needed to support the joints and provide better balance and bodily control. People with haemophilia should therefore be encouraged to be physically active but must remember to take their medication regularly to ensure they are protected.

It is important to discuss physical activity with your haemophilia team.

Physical exercise and staying active brings many general health benefits. It improves your fitness, boosts your self-esteem and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and some cancers.1

Regular physiotherapy, physical activity and exercise can be particularly beneficial for patients with haemophilia because it increases muscle strength and improves joint stability which can reduce your risk of injury, bleeds and joint damage.2

Get inspired

Clive’s story deomstrates that if you put your mind to something, you could accomplish extraordinary things even if they seem impossible at first. The story of Clive and his wife Clare, their drive and can-do attitude, is pure inspiration. What dream of yours are you ready to conquer?

How does exercise help my joints?

The joints in your body, including your knees, hips and ankles, are supported by different types of muscles. Reduced strength in these muscles can increase the risk of frequent joint bleeds, which as you know can lead to chronic swelling and pain. And this can result in a cycle of deterioration that continues with every bleed.

Exercise cycle

Exercise can protect your joints from deterioration by strengthening those muscles, improving your coordination and increasing your flexibility. It can also help you maintain a healthy weight, which minimises the stress on your joints. All these benefits work together in perfect harmony to reduce the frequency and severity of joint bleeds.

Exercise

What do I need to consider before I begin any physical activity? 

It is important to approach exercise and physical activity properly so that you gain the most from it.2 Before you start, there are a few factors to consider. What are your goals? What are your needs? These could be physical or emotional, or both. Here are some examples of the types of questions you might want to ask yourself:

What do I want to achieve from exercise?
What is my current physical ability?
What are my exercise and lifestyle goals?

Once you have given your needs and goals some thought, have a discussion with your physiotherapist, consultant or nurse. They can use this information to help you develop an exercise plan that is appropriate for you.2 
Together, you can:

Assess any potential risks associated with different types of sports and exercise routines
Consider strategies to help you manage those risks
Create a plan that will help you achieve your goals both physically and mentally

How do I choose an activity that's right for me? 

You should choose an activity based on your interests, goals and level of ability. Most sports are fine to participate in, however as someone with haemophilia, you may need to consider avoiding certain high contact sports that may increase your risk of injury,2,4 such as football or rugby. Instead, you could participate in lower intensity activities, such as 5-a-side football or touch rugby, which will still give you a good workout and can be just as fun and competitive (if that’s what you look for in a sport).2,4 With the help of your physiotherapist, you can choose the activities that are right for you.2,4

What things should I consider when developing a routine?

An exercise routine should incorporate activities that help to maintain and enhance your endurance and cardiovascular fitness, as well as your coordination, muscle strength, flexibility and balance.2 It is beneficial to exercise for approximately 30 minutes at regular intervals throughout the week.2 However, your physiotherapist will be able to advise what would be most suitable for you.

Take it slow!

Don’t do too much too soon. Overworking yourself can result in injury and may increase your risk of bleeds. Ease into your exercise routine and build up as the weeks progress. Muscle and joint aches during or after exercise or physical activity can be normal. However, it is important to stop what you are doing at any time if you experience any pain. If you suspect that you are bleeding during exercise, then contact your care team. Do not push yourself to finish the workout or activity.

What should I do before and after I exercise or take part in a physical activity? 

When starting exercise, it can be tempting to jump straight into the activity without warming up. However, not preparing your body properly can increase your risk of injury.2 Instead of starting at 100%, ease into your workout with a warm up routine that incorporates gentle exercise and different stretches to help you improve your flexibility and prepare your body for exertion.2

Cooling down after exercise is also important. It helps your muscles recover and prevents them from getting stiff. Starting and ending your activity in this way will reduce the likelihood of developing an injury that could slow down your progress.2 However, if you see a physiotherapist regularly, they will be able to advise you what would be most suitable for you!

Active life

Go win that football match!

Go that extra mile!

Go for the hole in one!

Should I plan my infusions around my exercise routine?

When planning an exercise routine, it is preferable to time your infusions accordingly. Try to plan to do your more active exercises when your factor levels are high to maximise your protection.2 Your haemophilia team will help you coordinate your infusion and exercise schedules in a way that is right for you.

If I incur an injury, when can I restart doing physical activity? 

There are a multitude of factors that will dictate when you can restart physical activity, such as the severity of the injury or bleed. Your physiotherapist and care team will be able to evaluate this and guide you through any rehabilitation that might be needed. All activities should be reintroduced gradually following a joint bleed or injury.4

REFERENCES:

1. Wittmeier K and Mulder K. Haemophilia 2007;13(2):31-37.
2. Negrier C, et al. Haemophilia 2013;19:487-498.
3. Tiktinsky R, et al. Haemophilia 2002;8:22-27.
4. World Federation of Hemophilia. Guidelines for the management of haemophilia. 2nd edition. 2012.

 

NP-8249
Date of preparation: October 2019