Changing treatments

Changing treatments?

Are you thinking about going on a trip, starting a new job or joining the match on Saturday?
Wondering which haemophilia treatment is the right one for you?
Considering which best suits your ambitions and gives you the freedom to lead the life you want?

Choosing a treatment is a big decision and figuring out the best option for your needs might require some research.  Whichever way you go about it, it is important that you and your haemophilia care team work together to make a decision you feel comfortable and happy with.

CHANGING IT UP


You are not tied to the first treatment you choose forever. If it is not right for you, you will in most cases have the option to change to one that better suits your needs.  You wont be the only one: most people with haemophilia have changed treatments at some point in their lives.1 Speak to your haemophilia care team to explore the treatment options available to you.

A treatment plan

What about inhibitors?


So what are inhibitors and why do you need to be monitored if you switch treatments?

Inhibitors are antibodies (proteins) that prevents factor replacement treatment from working. They are mentioned here because there may be a perception that switching treatments may increase the risk of developing inhibitors.

The risk of developing inhibitors is dependent on multiple things and some of these are totally unrelated to your treatment. As mentioned, many people with haemophilia have switched to different factor concentrates over the course of their treatment.1 There is little evidence to suggest that switching leads to the development of inhibitors in previously treated patients.1,2,4,5

The World Federation of Haemophilia (WFH) recommends that people living with haemophilia who change to new clotting factors should be monitored for inhibitor development4. This is just a precaution. Speak to your doctor if you have any concerns or questions about developing inhibitors when switching treatments.

In order to embrace the opportunities your life has to offer, you need to feel safe and comfortable with your treatment. If you are thinking about changing treatments it is a good idea to contact your treatment centre as soon as possible. They will review your treatment plan with you and tcan make sure the process of switching treatments is smooth as possible.

Ease your mind

If you are feeling anxious about treatment safety, the best thing you can do is speak to your haemophilia care team. This will help you feel more comfortable with, and confident in, the therapy you have chosen or the therapies you are considering.

Making the most of your doctor's visit

REFERENCES:
  1. Iorio A. Puccetti P, Makris M. Clotting factor concentrate switching and inhibitor development in hemophilia.A. Blood 2012Jul 26; 120(4):720 - 727.
  2. Coppola A, Marrone E, Conca P, Cimino E. Mormile R, Baldacci E, et al Safety of switching factor VIII products in the era of evolving concentrates: myths and facts. SeminThrombHemost. 2016Jl.14;42 (5):563- 576.
  3. Harrington C, Hay C, Vidler V, Dattani R, Heygate K. Switching factor products: selecting patients and managing the process. Journal of Haemophilia Practice 2014 May;l: 24- 29.
  4. World Federation of Hemophilia Guidelines for the management of haemophilia 2nd edition 2012. Available at: https://www1.wfh.org/publications/files/pdf-1472.pdf (accessed June 2019).
  5. Hay CR, Palmer BP, Chalmers EA, Hart DP, Liesner R, Rangarajan S, et al. The incidence of factor VIII inhibitors in severe haemophilia A following a major switch from full-length to B-domain-deleted factor VIII: a prospective cohort comparison. Haemophilia 2015 Mar:21(2:)219-226.
  6. European Medicines Agency. Guideline on the clinical investigation of recombinant and human plasma-derived factor VIII products EMA/CHMP/BPWP/ 144533/2009.2011. Available at https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/scientific-guideline/guideline-clinical-investigation-recombinant-human-plasma-derived-factor-viii-products-revision-2_en.pdf
  7. European Medicines Agency. Guideline on clinical investigation of recombinant and human plasma-derived factor lX products EMA/CHMP/BPWP/144552/ 2009Rev,. 1 Corr.1 •. 2015.

NP-9071
December 2019

Changing treatments?

Are you thinking about going on a trip, starting a new job or joining the match on Saturday?
Wondering which haemophilia treatment is the right one for you?
Considering which best suits your ambitions and gives you the freedom to lead the life you want?

Choosing a treatment is a big decision and figuring out the best option for your needs might require some research.  Whichever way you go about it, it is important that you and your haemophilia care team work together to make a decision you feel comfortable and happy with.

CHANGING IT UP


You are not tied to the first treatment you choose forever. If it is not right for you, you will in most cases have the option to change to one that better suits your needs.  You wont be the only one: most people with haemophilia have changed treatments at some point in their lives.1 Speak to your haemophilia care team to explore the treatment options available to you.

A treatment plan

What about inhibitors?


So what are inhibitors and why do you need to be monitored if you switch treatments?

Inhibitors are antibodies (proteins) that prevents factor replacement treatment from working. They are mentioned here because there may be a perception that switching treatments may increase the risk of developing inhibitors.

The risk of developing inhibitors is dependent on multiple things and some of these are totally unrelated to your treatment. As mentioned, many people with haemophilia have switched to different factor concentrates over the course of their treatment.1 There is little evidence to suggest that switching leads to the development of inhibitors in previously treated patients.1,2,4,5

The World Federation of Haemophilia (WFH) recommends that people living with haemophilia who change to new clotting factors should be monitored for inhibitor development4. This is just a precaution. Speak to your doctor if you have any concerns or questions about developing inhibitors when switching treatments.

In order to embrace the opportunities your life has to offer, you need to feel safe and comfortable with your treatment. If you are thinking about changing treatments it is a good idea to contact your treatment centre as soon as possible. They will review your treatment plan with you and tcan make sure the process of switching treatments is smooth as possible.

Ease your mind

If you are feeling anxious about treatment safety, the best thing you can do is speak to your haemophilia care team. This will help you feel more comfortable with, and confident in, the therapy you have chosen or the therapies you are considering.

Making the most of your doctor's visit

REFERENCES:
  1. Iorio A. Puccetti P, Makris M. Clotting factor concentrate switching and inhibitor development in hemophilia.A. Blood 2012Jul 26; 120(4):720 - 727.
  2. Coppola A, Marrone E, Conca P, Cimino E. Mormile R, Baldacci E, et al Safety of switching factor VIII products in the era of evolving concentrates: myths and facts. SeminThrombHemost. 2016Jl.14;42 (5):563- 576.
  3. Harrington C, Hay C, Vidler V, Dattani R, Heygate K. Switching factor products: selecting patients and managing the process. Journal of Haemophilia Practice 2014 May;l: 24- 29.
  4. World Federation of Hemophilia Guidelines for the management of haemophilia 2nd edition 2012. Available at: https://www1.wfh.org/publications/files/pdf-1472.pdf (accessed June 2019).
  5. Hay CR, Palmer BP, Chalmers EA, Hart DP, Liesner R, Rangarajan S, et al. The incidence of factor VIII inhibitors in severe haemophilia A following a major switch from full-length to B-domain-deleted factor VIII: a prospective cohort comparison. Haemophilia 2015 Mar:21(2:)219-226.
  6. European Medicines Agency. Guideline on the clinical investigation of recombinant and human plasma-derived factor VIII products EMA/CHMP/BPWP/ 144533/2009.2011. Available at https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/scientific-guideline/guideline-clinical-investigation-recombinant-human-plasma-derived-factor-viii-products-revision-2_en.pdf
  7. European Medicines Agency. Guideline on clinical investigation of recombinant and human plasma-derived factor lX products EMA/CHMP/BPWP/144552/ 2009Rev,. 1 Corr.1 •. 2015.

NP-9071
December 2019